Omaha slumlords, Sovereign Citizens and Christian Nationalists

A self-described “free inhabitant,” Paul John Hansen represents himself in court, signing legal documents “Lawyer / Counsel without the United States.” (2011 Photo by Bill Kelly, NET News)

 

 

PART ONE

“He doesn’t have a driver’s license. He lives in Omaha and owns his vehicle. Paul Hansen doesn’t register it with Douglas County. If stopped for a traffic violation he’ll explain to the police officer that he “doesn’t use one.” His next step is to ask if the officer has “any evidence this land is owned by the United States of America. Do you understand that if you issue me a ticket you will be on the witness stand and you will have to produce that evidence?”” writes KVNO News in 2011 on Paul Hansen’s rising prominence in Christian nationalist and anti-tax circles. Hansen was indicted on federal mail fraud in 2014 linked to a Florida man convicted in 2006 of tax evasion and fraud by means of concealing wealth in churches.

Hansen owns multiple rundown rental properties in north Omaha that he refuses to make basic repairs on, or pay the applicable property taxes. In the last decade at least two of his properties were condemned and torn down by order of the city of Omaha. Residents point out water heaters with thick rust, non-working toilets, and doors without locks which were jammed shut with steak knives as the only means of security. One former tenant signed over their Social Security Insurance checks to cover rent, a predatory act in which Hansen was later sued for in federal court. Hansen is a slumlord and a right-wing ideologue exploiting low-income people for profit. Hansen isn’t an anomaly either. In Atlanta, a wealthy group of well-known white nationalists run a “gentrification gang” as Atlanta anti-fascists call them.

In Omaha, Hansen is a familiar figure in the Douglas County courthouse because he routinely ignores or challenges citations for building code violations on his rental properties. The Nebraska Supreme Court issued an injunction in 2014 for him to stop practicing unlicensed law, and he’s been spotted at the courthouse twice already in 2018, according to tips sent to the antifaneb@riseup.net email.

Broadly, Hansen calls himself a “free inhabitant” or a sovereign citizen, a far-right movement often found overlapping with white separatist militia movements and Christian doomsday cults.

More specifically, Paul Hansen personally does not believe most U.S. laws apply to him based on his religion and interpretations of constitutional law, and obscure 18th-century Ordinances. Cops and court officials come into contact with these people most commonly in forms of protesting vehicle registration laws, traffic and permit citations, or the filing of civil suits and property liens.

It was a series of property liens Hansen fraudulently filed that eventually got him 18 months in federal prison on two accounts of contempt of court; the larger federal mail fraud charges resulted in a hung jury and the retrial was dismissed without prejudice. Hansen filed the false lien claims in an attempt to prevent the federal seizure of property held by Kent Hovind, the convicted Florida preacher that operated an anti-evolution theme park/church called Dinosaur Adventure Land, “a place where dinosaurs and the Bible meet.” Hovind made Hansen a trustee of his church, Creation Science Evangelism, that believes in a literal interpretation of the Bible which says Earth was made in seven days roughly 6000 years ago. The two of them exchanged letters while Hovind was incarcerated and conspired to obstruct the seizing of land by way of falsified document. The pair obviously did not understand jail mail is not confidential.

Hansen is not the first or only sovereign citizen in Nebraska. In fact, the 1980s were a boom time for the movement. Civic libertarian tax-protesters and heavily armed white separatist militias cropped up all over.

In Cairo, Nebraska in 1984, Arthur Kirk, a farmer with sympathies for a local sovereign militia was killed in a gun fight with SWAT after threatening county sheriffs trying to serve legal papers from a bank. He died behind a sandbag barricade with a modified fully automatic AR-15, wearing a gas mask, a steel helmet, and his face painted in night camouflage. The local bank alleged he made hundreds of thousands of dollars in unaccounted livestock sales.

The Posse Comitatus was a right-wing extremist group started by a neo-Nazi in Portland, Oregon with over two dozen chapters in the U.S., one being an 80-acre armed compound near Rulo, Nebraska that housed a doomsday prepper death-cult led by Michael Ryan. The Posse Comitatus supported Arthur Kirk’s fight against the tyranny of the banks and police. Posse Comitatus claimed the true intent of the country’s founders was to establish a Christian republic where the individual was sovereign, and that the Republic’s first duty was to promote, safeguard, and protect the Christian faith. They saw farmers as the victims of a Jewish-led, communist-supported conspiracy that had infiltrated the government. They thought the conspiracy would rob the farmer of his land through manipulation of land values, grain prices and credit. Once they controlled the land, Posse Comitatus thought it would control the food supply too. In Rulo, Michael Ryan proceeded over polygamist weddings, thefts of farm equipment, and carried out ritual torture, bestiality, and murder. He died in 2015 of natural causes while serving a commuted death row sentence for the grisly murders of a 5-year-old boy and 26-year-old man living on the farm. Michael Ryan was an embodiment of the white Sharia meme thirty years early.

In 2015, Donna Marie Kozak, a sovereign citizen living in the Omaha suburb of La Vista, Nebraska was convicted in federal court of tax evasion, tax fraud, and filing false liens on properties owned by a federal judge, U.S. district attorneys, IRS investigators, and for sending harassing messages to IRS agents. Kozak was essentially trolling federal agents in retaliation for her initial tax evasion arrest.

To authorities, this form of trolling protest –filing fraudulent tax returns or falsifying documents to obstruct the collection of property taxes or property seizure, or filing civil lawsuits for petty reasons– is called “paper terrorism” to add extra weight on what is otherwise just the gaming of a bureaucracy for fun and profit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sovereigns have manufactured their own license plates and identification cards indicating they are citizens of a self-proclaimed “republic,” and have even created otherwise fictional Native American tribes, or claimed non-existent enrollment with real tribes. One high profile example is the former Pussycat Dolls singer Kaya Jones, as she claimed generational Apache enrollment. The blonde Canadian pop singer claimed the “Indigenous” seat on the privately-funded National Diversity Coalition for Trump. These claims all fall apart under minimal scrutiny, but to the traffic cop’s first glance, the counterfeit plates and documents often appear legitimate.

The feds and the ADL consider the Sovereign Citizen movement as a potential source of “domestic terrorism.” The ADL lists sovereigns as an extremist group willing to use vigilante courts to “wage war against the government using ‘paper terrorism’ to intimidate government officials.”

Hansen says to KVNO News, “my view is there are no written laws in place to govern free inhabitants. There’s the jury of twelve and there’s God’s word,” he explained.

The ‘jury of twelve’ often referred to is a commonlaw jury convened by ‘free citizens’ rather than by a court system put in place by federal and state law.

Since the day before Hansen’s sentencing in 2015, and up to and beyond their release from prison, Hansen and Hovind have discussed on Youtube and on t heir respective blogs about convening such a court to hold their perceived enemies in the IRS responsible for putting them in jail. They want to exact revenge. By the power of whatever bizarre bureaucratic oversight god, Hansen and Hovind actually shared a cell for three months when their sentences overlapped.

Whenever he can get away with it, Hansen does not pay federal income or local property taxes. Sales taxes are trickier, since they are added to the cost of a purchase, but Hansen says he has convinced some retailers he qualifies as being exempt for paying them on some big ticket items.

Every one of his challenges to local, state and federal law rise from a set of complex political beliefs built on a complex interpretation of the Ordinance of the Northwest Territory of 1787 and the Articles of Confederation ratified by the original thirteen colonies in 1781.

“Article four in the Articles of the Confederation gives you two choices,” he explained during a lengthy conversation. “You can live your life as a free inhabitant or as a citizen. Now the word citizen means subject. So the moment I step on US land I become a US citizen, a US subject. The moment you step on my land you become my subject.” Hansen goes into much greater detail on his website. Hansen also consults and sells his self-developed legal philosophies, in spite of that Supreme Court injunction meant to stop him from doing so.

Sovereign citizens are the Boomer antecedent to Reddit “anarcho” capitalists. They take anarchist ideas against authority and add a self-excluding addendum that allows them to be exclusionary, coercive, abusive, patriarchal, violent, selfish children. “No gods, no masters” becomes “My way or the toll highway.”

 

Daniel Kleve: Nebraska White Supremacist Who Praises Violence Poses Unique Challenges to Campus Free Speech

REPOST NEWSWEEK Michael Edison Hayden On 2/13/18 at 12:16 PM
http://www.newsweek.com/nebraska-white-supremacist-unique-challenges-campus-free-speech-804442
The University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) receives messages and phones calls about Daniel Kleve all the time these days. The 23-year-old undergraduate biochemistry major is a white supremacist who is overtly racist and dangerous, his classmates say. They don’t want to share classes with him, they don’t want to bump into him in a dining hall—they don’t want to see the tawny-haired man on campus ever again.

Antifascist Action Nebraska, a local group that has developed a national reputation among activists for the relentlessness with which it tracks the movements of white supremacists, published a video of Kleve speaking with other extremists on Google Hangout, and it went viral last week, further inflaming the sense of outrage about him.

“Just because I dress like a normie—a regular person—doesn’t mean I don’t love violence,” Kleve said to a group of peers regarding his ambitions as a white supremacist. “Trust me. I want to be violent. Trust me. Really violent.”

Kleve, who is fond of posting selfies with guns to social media, also said that “now is not the right time” for violence, and he has argued that the edited video took his words out of context—but the language spoke for itself to students who were already concerned about him and his demonstrable connections to neo-Nazi groups. Hundreds of students demanding Kleve’s expulsion gathered on campus grounds to stage a protest on Wednesday of last week, adding a physical presence to what was already a sustained campaign of activism.

The question about what to do with the increasingly isolated Kleve is emblematic of a larger issue facing colleges across the country. Even though the era of so-called alt-right politics that arose during the populist campaign of Donald Trump has shown signs of fracturing, it has emboldened a small but not insignificant number of young, white men to come forward with white supremacist or neo-Nazi beliefs. As this is happening, women, minorities and other communities that are threatened by the political goals of such men are becoming more sensitive to their presence, and demanding that schools take action to protect them. Young white supremacists were tied to a number of murders last year, further complicating the issue. The situation is a complex one, and it poses challenges to both administrators and to advocates of free speech.

Samantha Harris, a researcher with Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), told Newsweek that the question of whether to expel an extremist like Kleve is typically drawn along one line: All political beliefs should be tolerated in academia, but “actual harassment is not protected speech.” By “actual harassment,” Harris said she meant anything that prohibits someone from receiving a normal education.

In the case of Kleve, the university told Newsweek it was not clear he had made any threats against a specific student or students. But his classmates have told Newsweek that Kleve made them feel uneasy because they believed him to be capable of unleashing violence at any time. Additionally, Calvin Scott, 19, Kleve’s former roommate at an off-campus housing facility, and Scott’s friend, Jackie Schneider, 20, told Newsweek that Kleve made violent threats against people of color—generally and also about specific individuals. Both Scott and Schneider are people of color themselves, but neither of them are UNL students. Kleve has denied making such threats. UNL campus police told Newsweek that Kleve currently represented an active investigation, but declined to elaborate any further about what it entailed.

The issue is tricky for UNL to navigate for reasons beyond the obvious. Politicians in the Republican-dominated state have been fiercely critical of the school for what they perceive to be its mistreatment of conservatives. The state is currently reviewing a bill surrounding campus free speech, for example, one of several similar measures being examined throughout the country. The Nebraska measure, Legislative Bill 718, introduced by state Senator Steve Halloran of Hastings, would force schools like UNL to create a “Committee on Free Expression” to provide an annual incident report to state residents about free speech matters. Critics say the bill, which was issued in response to a graduate student and lecturer who gave the finger to a student who was recruiting for a conservative group, is intended to amplify only voices of Republican students on campus. In response to the incident, UNL will not renew a contract to teach issued to the graduate student who made the gesture.

In addition to this, the University of Nebraska Board of Regents has adopted its own policies to delineate areas where certain kinds of speech are permissible on campus. “When people want to censor viewpoints that people don’t like, universities have to step in and protect free speech,” Harris of FIRE argued to Newsweek, referring to both right- and left-leaning viewpoints. FIRE has defended not only conservative viewpoints on campus, but wrote a letter criticizing UNL for the way it treated the graduate student and lecturer caught up in the scandal.

Adding to UNL’s headache with Kleve is that Nebraska is a racially homogenous state. It’s nearly 90% white, according to census data. UNL said it has worked to strengthen diversity on campus, and boasted an enrollment of 3,173 minority undergraduate students in 2017, or 15.1 percent of the undergraduate total. It might not seem like very much compared to other state schools in the country, but it represents the most diverse student body in the university’s 149-year history. The growing scandal surrounding Kleve—who called himself “the most active white nationalist in the Nebraska area”—not only undercuts those gains in recruitment, but potentially puts existing minority students at risk of danger, according to critics.

“Trust me. Really violent.”

The students who claim Kleve is a danger to others argue that the school should be looking at his history to understand their concerns. He appeared in Charlottesville, Virginia on August 12 in a contingent with Vanguard America, the white supremacist group whose followers included James Fields, the man charged with murdering antiracist activist Heather Heyer in a brutal car-ramming incident. He also posted photos of himself next to an Atomwaffen flag in 2017. Atomwaffen is a neo-Nazi group that has garnered headlines for being linked to a number of murders. Kleve told me he has “publicly disavowed” Atomwaffen, and no longer belongs to any white supremacist groups, but as recently as this year, he was posting white supremacist slogans on Facebook, and endorsing “the Order,” a fictional collective depicted in the neo-Nazi propaganda book The Turner Diaries.

In the book, “the Order” slaughtered Jews, non-whites and other minorities in part of a make-believe race war. The book was admired by terrorists like Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh and David Copeland, a British man who murdered three people in a bombing campaign that was targeted at minorities in 1999. Keegan Hankes, an intelligence analyst with Southern Poverty Law Center, told Newsweek that people “should be concerned” about violence when dealing with those who associate with Vanguard America and Atomwaffen, even peripherally.

“Everyone has to remember that this ideology is founded on building a white ethnostate,” Hankes said. “They believe that they are fighting for the survival of the white race.”

Scott, who lived with Kleve from mid-October to the start of December 2017, told Newsweek that Kleve had an AR-15 assault rifle that he kept in a common area of their apartment. Schneider, Scott’s friend, said she saw the weapon as well but thought it was a shotgun. (She admitted to not knowing much about firearms, while Scott claimed to have a better understanding of them.) Scott also told Newsweek that Kleve kept a pistol “on him.” Nebraska is an open-carry state, and Lincoln Police confirmed to Newsweek that Kleve would be legally allowed to carry a weapon outside of campus. Kleve told Newsweek that his guns were purchased legally but would not elaborate on how many he owns, or their makes and models. He denied owning an AR-15, but declined to answer whether he owned any similar weapons that could be mistaken for one.

Scott said he didn’t report to the police about threats Kleve made because he didn’t trust them to do their job, but he reported his roommate to the housing complex, asking for a separation. A report issued by the administration of their housing complex and given to Newsweek confirmed that Scott had expressed “concerns” about his roommate at the time he lived with Kleve. Their relationship ended when Kleve moved out. Kleve claimed Scott was making up stories about him.

“Nothing has changed,” Leslie Reed, a spokesperson for the school, told Newsweek while students were protesting Kleve’s presence, regarding their hesitancy to remove him from UNL.

The University of Nebraska can’t “discriminate against someone for having unpopular political beliefs,” she said previously.

“I can’t wait to graduate so that I can get out of everyone’s hair”

Students who spoke to Newsweek about Kleve, who frequently boasts about what he believes to be his talents as a propagandist, suggested that his tactics are having the opposite of their intended impact. Kleve is not only failing to make recruiting in-roads for his cause, the students claimed, but his views have made him into a pariah on campus. On Saturday, for example, the Nebraska’s men’s basketball team waged a protest against his presence before their game with Rutgers. The men wore T-shirts that read, “Hate Will Never Win.” Student athletes across campus, in fact, have used their influence to condemn Kleve, and a search for his name on Twitter will turn up what looks like a deluge of disgust from fellow classmates.

Harris of FIRE argued to Newsweek that condemnation and debate is the best way to deal with a student like Kleve, so long as he was not harassing or endangering specific students. “The best way to combat [white supremacist advocacy] is with more speech and better ideas.” But because of Kleve’s apparent racist fixation with violence, he potentially represents a different case than other “alt-right” figures who have stirred protest on campuses.

One similar case to Kleve’s is that of Mark Daniel Neuhoff, a 27-year-old graduate student in Virginia Tech’s English department. Neuhoff’s presence on campus sparked a massive outcry in the fall semester of 2017. Posts from Neuhoff’s Facebook account that appeared to endorse white supremacy, Hitler and the Nazi application of “Jewish stars” during World War II were leaked by a local antifascist group. Students were outraged when they saw them, and their feelings were complicated by the fact that Neuhoff taught undergraduates in his capacity as a teacher’s assistant.

Virginia Tech told Newsweek that following relentless protests and phone calls, the administration and Neuhoff came to a quiet agreement that he would no longer teach there. Since that time, Neuhoff has become an outcast. He said he was grateful for the way the administration handled his case, but expressed feelings of despair and loneliness in describing his time in school there. He suggested that colleagues had ostracized him and severed all ties.

He told Newsweek that he was actually a “paleoconservative monarchist” and not a white supremacist, despite his posts appearing to praise Hitler, and claimed that his views were taken out of context. He also complained that the posts that appeared to many students to be deeply anti-Semitic were made on a locked feed, and that antifascist activists had infiltrated his account.

“It’s made me feel extremely unwelcome and I can’t wait to graduate so that I can get out of everyone’s hair and they can get out of mine,” he told Newsweek about the atmosphere of his education.

While Neuhoff longs to make an exit from academia, others on the far-right are eager to make inroads there, but so far with extremely limited success. Matthew Heimbach of Traditionalist Worker’s Party (TWP), a small but active neo-Nazi group, is attempting to start a college speaking tour called “National Socialism or Death” at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville later this month. He told Newsweek that the point of the exercise is to find common ground with “conservatives and socialists.” As with rallies staged by white supremacist Richard Spencer, though, protesters of the event are expected to outnumber his supporters. Heimbach argued that he was doing it to argue for a “safe space for fascists” in academia, but it is also unclear that fascist beliefs are really treated with any intolerance by administrators. Students like Neuhoff and Kleve are isolated, but they are also enrolled.

White supremacist speaking events come at a time when the movement is aggressively papering propaganda across American colleges. The Anti-Defamation League has documented 346 incidents of white supremacist propaganda appearing on campuses since the start of the 2016 school year, including “fliers, stickers, banners, and posters.” The incidents span 216 campuses across 44 states. Andrew Oswalt, a graduate student at Oregon State University, drew headlines for being arrested last month for a July 2017 incident in which he and other white men allegedly placed racist bumper stickers on the backs of cars, but those who monitor the far right argue that he may be an exception to the rule. Most white supremacists who target campuses do so because they feel excluded from campus life, and dismissed by intellectuals generally speaking, rather than the other way around.

The far right is a busy but ultimately small online community, at least when it comes to people who don’t operate anonymously. Neuhoff is Facebook friends with Kleve and interacts with him from time to time. He said that while Kleve is more involved with “what people call white nationalism, national socialism, and the pro-white cause in general,” he identifies with Kleve because of the degree to which they’ve been alienated from their peers in a left-leaning environment.

“Our cases are the same,” Neuhoff argued to Newsweek about Kleve. “We have views other people don’t like and they’re taking things out of context or using any possible tactic to cause us harm while trying to convince people we are violent.”

But two substantial differences exist between the complaints about Kleve and Neuhoff. Neuhoff told Newsweek that he never belonged to a white supremacist or neo-Nazi group. During the violence at the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville that Saturday afternoon in August, for example, he said that he was in church. (Neuhoff is in the process of converting to Christian Orthodox after having grown up in a non-religious household.) Also, he said he doesn’t own any guns.

“The student’s viewpoint — however hateful and intolerant it is — is also protected by the First Amendment.”

Justin Myers, 18, a freshman business student at UNL and a self-described conservative, told Newsweek that while he wasn’t sure if Kleve had done enough to be “legally kicked off campus” in terms of his praise of violence, he would feel uncomfortable being anywhere near him in class.

Myers also argued that there was a difference between the campus debates about free speech between conservatives and leftists, and the threat of overt neo-Nazism. “These guys hate our system of government and the freedoms we have,” Myers said.

But for the school’s administration, Kleve is being treated like any other student.

“I have heard from many of you in our community and beyond, calling for this student to be removed from campus based on concern for safety and outright disgust and rejection of the ideologies represented,” school Chancellor Ronnie Green wrote, acknowledging that he himself “categorically rejects” such viewpoints. “The student’s viewpoint — however hateful and intolerant it is — is also protected by the First Amendment.”

Kleve, for his part, changed his tone dramatically when speaking to Newsweek via text message as the controversy on campus unfolded last week. Initially, Kleve came across as dismissive, mocking journalism, but as time went on and the controversy over his captured remarks about violence grew, his tone both to Newsweek and on social media evolved into something much more personal and anxious. He said that he valued his education, and looked forward to becoming a doctor.

“I have never claimed to be perfect,” Kleve wrote on Facebook while criticizing a local news article that mentioned him being arrested at the age of 17 for possession of marijuana. “I lived in different foster homes from the moment of my birth and grew up in a degenerate environment.”

As he posted those remarks, the anger about him only seemed to grow online.

“EXPEL DAN KLEVE,” a woman wrote on Twitter late Thursday morning after the school had posted its explanation for not taking action. “Get rid of Dan Kleve,” another female student pleaded a few hours later on the site. Fifteen minutes after that, a male student piped in: “Kleve is in violation of the student code of conduct. He should be removed for the safety of all.”

Kleve finally acknowledged on his Twitter account on Monday what he would not tell Newsweek in multiple conversations over text message: The sustained campaign to expel him, the local news reports on his situation and the silent treatment he had received from other classmates had driven him to the point of despair.

“I feel exactly how my enemy wants me to feel,” Kleve wrote in the context of saying that he would not give up his politics. “Alone, powerless, and void of any hope for the future.”

Cooper Ward, Omaha white nationalist

On December 16th, 2016, we submitted a report to It’s Going Down on the once rising alt-right media darling Cooper Ward. At the time of the report, Cooper was enrolled at University of Nebraska-Omaha, was a regular guest on the podcast The Daily Shoah, deputy director of American Vanguard (aka Reaction America, aka Vanguard America, aka Patriot Front), and the content creator for the Counter-Signal Memes for Fashy Goys page on Facebook.

We had an eye on Cooper for months before his grand coming out party. It was in the comments of his meme page where he posted an obscured selfie but forgot to blur the Nebraska license plate of his car parked in his mom’s driveway. He made appearances at pre-election anti-Trump rallies in the Omaha metro in failed attempts to “trigger timid shitlibs” by using genius brain skills gained from his partial philosophy degree. His bearded, lumbering appearance and stammering lines of questioning at these rallies didn’t go unnoticed, but wasn’t the masterful trolling he considered it to be. It wasn’t until Cooper unmasked himself on his Youtube channel feeling emboldened by the election of Trump, and freshly shaved with a bleached combover, that he began airing his sick owns on The Bone Zone. It was then we realized the podcasting memelord and the tall awkward guy at rallies we already knew by name were one in the same.

On November 8, the Vanguard Nebraska account tweeted a photo of a group holding the flag. When a community radio dj reposted it, she says many people contacted her to say they were tricked into holding it by two guys claiming in was in support of U.S. troops. The photo was taken sometime in the late summer of 2016 while Jesse “SeventhSonTRS” Dunstan visited Cooper in Omaha. The local tv news quoted the false claim of 100 Vanguard members in Nebraska in a Twitter interview with the person running the Vanguard Nebraska account, and calling himself Sam Hyde, the name of a comedian attached to the alt-right famous for being named as a suspect after mass shootings.

Less than two weeks after we exposed what he already laid bare, Cooper began denying the claims made against him in emails to IGD, later proposing a quid pro quo that if they deleted the post, he would identify other hosts of The Daily Shoah and recede from public life faster than his hairline.

On January 9th, the new semester at UNO began and students were met with a flurry of flyers alerting them of the threat Ward’s racist, genocidal ideology posed on campus. The same day he dropped all his classes and retreated back to his mom’s McMansion in West Omaha.

Pro-cop twitter account “meanstreetsoma” screenshot

A full timeline of the month-long domino effect we caused in The Right Stuff podcasting empire is documented on the blog Angry White Men.

Below is the first statement originally posted to IGD, and the follow-up where Cooper Ward offered to snitch. If only more fascists believed in the noble creed of death before dishonor.

The response from the /pol/ chans lit up with fear, anger, and disgust that their heroes weren’t who they claimed to be, and had to find out from their ideological enemies. Natural to the environment of 4chan and 8chan, each dox let a thousand conspiracy theories bloom. Claims that Cooper used TRS and Vanguard America meet-ups as a way to groom underage boys for sex, to the idea that because Mike “Enoch” Peinovich was married to a Jewish woman and lived on the Upper East Side of New York City he couldn’t possibly be a “real” white nationalist, and must be a CIA ‘controlled opposition’ asset meant to cause rifts in their movement. Whether Peinovich actually separated with his wife isn’t much of anyone else’s concern, but it certainly made their professional lives harder. If Ward was really grooming children, we have not seen any reports of victims coming forward yet (and they might forever be silenced out of fear), but it was a serious enough concern for Vanguard America to set an 18 and over membership requirement shortly afterwards.

 

We have entered an era where the disgusting and vile approach of once-closeted fascists and racists has become an accepted norm on the American stage. The normalization has begun, with excuses by not only the right, but also the liberals who believe the hatred espoused by these “people” is “freedom of speech.” Are they so blind to not understand that the fascist calls from behind their podium of lies is a recruiting tool? Are they so blind to not understand that this hatred espoused by these Nazis rallies their forces, and influences other white nationalist individuals to partake in lone wolf direct action?

We believe in silencing the hate speech of these shadowy organizations as a defensive action for all marginalized people forced to hide in fear. We believe in direct action to defend all communities that may find themselves threatened.

As Antifascist Action-Nebraska, we have dedicated our work towards hunting down and exposing these Alt-Right Nazis.

We have chosen to expose the Deputy Leader of American Vanguard who is an Omaha resident. American Vanguard is a White Nationalist organization responsible for the poster/flyer campaigns at Purdue University, Florida Gulf Coast University, the University of Maryland as well as street corners across the country under their “Northern Propaganda Campaign”.

This is a war, they fired the first shots, now all people of conscience must join with us and fight the scourge of Nazism.

Cooper Ward is the co-host of the alt-right Nazi Podcast “The Daily Shoah”, as well as a member and deputy leader of the nationwide white nationalist group American Vanguard. It is believed that Cooper Ward acts as a recruiter for American Vanguard.

Ward operates out of his mom’s home in Omaha, Nebraska. Ward has been printing white nationalist posters and distributing them. We in Nebraska have begun to see these posters on our street corners, joining with a myriad of other cities and states who have been infected with American Vanguard propaganda.

In solidarity.
Antifascist Action-Nebraska

 

 

November 4th “civil war” hoax

What if the Right memed a civil war and no one showed? Just a bunch of empty white sheets moaning about blood and soil.

#RefuseFascism, which is the name of the November 4th protest march that is only slated in a handful of large cities, is meant to drive out the “Trump/Pence Regime” so says the advertising by the formerly Maoist organization founded in the 1970s, Revolutionary Communist Party, USA. The current form of RCP, or RevCom, is a staple of protests in NYC, if at times an unwelcome staple.

The group’s plans for Nov. 4, which have become shrouded in misinformation helpfully guided by right-wing media willfully misleading their readers into thinking a joke tweeted by a popular account was a real threat when it said “can’t wait for November 4th when millions of antifa supersoldiers will behead all white parents and small business owners in the town square.”

Of course the otherwise rational and level-headed consumers of racist and anti-Semitic conspiracy theories peddled by Breitbart, Alex Jones, and Fox News would notice an absurdist joke when they saw one, right? Right? Alt-right?

Wrong. Within hours @KrangTNelson, the comedy twitter account responsible was suspended in a mass-report campaign and was being called the “ANTIFA Leader” in Breitbart. In Newsweek the “Antifa Supersoldier” myth was examined and debunked. On Facebook, trigger-happy threats became more pronounced at the fear of an anti-fascist civil war that ballooned to even more comical proportions by sweeping in associations with ISIS and MS-13, and U.S. Military sleeper cells, and even the United Nations!

In Omaha, a self-identified Patriot on Craigslist put out the call to defend against the oxymoron of planned riots at Memorial Park intended to tear down statues or something. The post says they “reached out to biker groups (such as freedom riders, and bikers for Jesus christ), Republican groups, libertarian groups, veteran groups, etc. I have also let the sarpy and Douglas County sherrifs know” it also reminds anyone going not to cause violence. The call was picked up by a Stormfront poster and urged optics homogeneity. “I ask you not to bring swastika flags or dress in kkk clothing. let’s blend in with the other right wingers don’t do anything illegal.” If you have to constantly remind your supporters to not be violent, it suggests violence is the default of right-wing events and counter-protests. The last three major white nationalist events have concluded on violent terms.

8/12 Charlottesville, VA Unite the Right: vehicular murder
10/19 Gainesville, FL Richard Spencer speech: attempted murder by firearm
10/28 Shelbyville, TN White Lives Matter rally: interracial couple assaulted at a bar

Sources:
https://omaha.craigslist.org/vol/d/november-4th-patriots-stand/6367595648.html (http://archive.is/g1VA3)

Stormfront archive (http://archive.is/6q4do)

https://mic.com/articles/amp/185680/the-far-right-thinks-a-violent-antifa-overthrow-is-coming-nov-4-but-the-truth-is-far-stranger

http://www.newsweek.com/antifa-supersoldiers-coming-kill-white-people-right-wing-conspiracy-699037?amp=1

 

 

Brent Fox, white nationalist recruiter, Daily Stormer Book Club

brent selfie

Brent Fox, an Omaha, Nebraska “book club” recruiter for the neo-Nazi forum Daily Stormer. Brent is active in the Millard & West Omaha area, but recruits online for the Greater Omaha and Council Bluffs area, and attempts to expand his little circle of fascists by hosting members of the Des Moines, Iowa Stormer book club.

brent recruiting

(screenshot of the Daily Stormer with the Algerian domain suffix, active as of 8/29/2017, where the forum landed after all major domain hosting companies refused service to the website owner Andrew Anglin, following the deadly end of the Unite the Right rally organized in part by Anglin.)

 

Brent Fox is known on Daily Stormer as Fashy_fox, on twitter as @Lycalopex, on the road as Nebraska plate TPN 540, and he posted his professional email civilianfox@yahoo in the Omaha book club. The same email Brent uses on his resume, which he also helpfully posted online, however it is not up-to-date as of this posting. Brent is fluent in Russian and is a former Network Administrator II for the US Air Force Department of Defense. Civilian IT contractors that can’t figure out how Google works are running the backend of your defense systems, America.

(screenshot from the briefly held PunishedStormer during the interim of all major domain hosting companies refusing service to the website owner Andrew Anglin.)

On the The Right Stuff he is lycalopex, but has let it sit dormant, because like many white nationalists of the post-Trump election era that want to take their online hate to irl, TRS doesn’t present as deep of a well considering it is less centered on small cell organizing and more centered on non-stop fundraising via podcasts.

On Daily Stormer, Brent appears to have also claimed a leadership role in the Alt-Right card distribution the Omaha Stormer Book Club took part in at the 2017 College World Series where a Black man had his car window broken and a card left behind in the window seal. Brent gives a “friendly reminder that we do not break laws” and suggests the man broke his own window, but does not however deny leaving the Alt-Right card. This is the same incident where Omaha Stormer Book Club member Matt “Oktoberfaust” Johnson was found to have made a similar claim in a Youtube comment on the 3 News Now video segment. Matt was subsequently kicked out of his band and fired from his job in the same week he was exposed to have traveled to the “race realist” American Renaissance conference as a member of the criminal group of white nationalists known as Identity Evropa.

brent ds window(screenshot from the briefly held PunishedStormer during the interim of all major domain hosting companies refusing service to the website owner Andrew Anglin.)

Barrel bar stormer

Brent Fox, back left, and his Daily Stormer Book Club hate group, photographed the Thursday before smashing windows at CWS.

Here, Brent Fox says “I admire what you did” to ‘Ghoul’ just days after news that Ghoul is exposed as Cooper Ward, then-Deputy Director of Vanguard America, the same white nationalist group James Alex Fields belonged to on the day he drove his car into the back of anti-racist and anti-fascist marchers in Charlottesville, Virginia injuring dozens and killing Heather Heyer on August 12, 2017.

brent ds 1

Archived links:

Nathan “Fashy Mav” Patterson at UNO

19149388_1698600180169092_2210618276432074536_n

Nathan Patterson, a 20 year old Management of Information Systems student at University of Nebraska-Omaha, is the type of fascist that can fly under the radar by claiming his interest in National Socialism is purely an aesthetic one. Nate is a hobby vexillologist – a person that studies flags. Nate’s specific interest in flags leans so far to the hard right, he personally identifies himself on Voat as a “National Socialist, Midwest Secessionist, programmer”. His Iron Guard flag is so obscure it probably gets him called a hipster in vexillology circles.  The Iron Guard is the name most commonly given to a far-right movement and political party in Romania from 1927 into the early part of World War II. In 1940, the Iron Guard led an attempted genocide of Jewish Romanians.

Nate Patterson also wants to start a podcast about these topics, specifically on waging a war to secede Nebraska and create a white ethno-state. Any takers? He’s also on Facebook and Twitter as @n8patty

Nathan Patterson’s interest in fascism exceeds way beyond visual appreciation of flags when he’s submitting videos to v/Fascism of speeches by George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of the American Nazi Party. Another post submitted by Nate titled Fascists_irl shows a soldier with his head in his hands and the caption “When you realize Hitler was right” (archived link http://archive.is/alsDX) and another posted to v/SeriousDiscussion asked “Why is fascism so frowned upon here?” to which he replies:

I want a father figure to show me the ropes and guide me through life. Most people in the world would agree with me, considering about 53% follow some sort of Abrahamic religion.

Nate Patterson, to no surprise,  was active on the Daily Stormer where he shared his love of flags and fascism under the name Fashy_Mav, the Mavericks being UNO’s sports team. With the dissolution of the neo-Nazi forum and all of the cached posts, it is easier for all members to deny any connection, just like Nate thinks he can wrap his racist, anti-Semitic and homophobic desires of genocide in a cool looking flag.

fashy mav 2

On his personal Github blog and Reddit, Nate goes by the name kypres where he shares more of his flag love. He redesigned the Nebraska state flag and used the same Imgur link each time he boasted his design skills, and it is how we linked his social media to his name by simply Googling the url.

Archived links:

Trump flag portrait: http://archive.is/e0QuU

Voat profile: http://archive.is/KraDl

Iron Guard flag: http://archive.is/exR9P

r/Omaha podcast request: http://archive.is/Z3FSv

Facebook: http://archive.is/iKhFH

Rockwell video submission: http://archive.is/io52x

Fascists_irl: http://archive.is/alsDX

v/SeriousDiscussion: http://archive.is/TndLT

Daily Stormer: http://archive.is/KT8Yq

Github blog: http://archive.is/8I6XE

r/Nebraska: http://archive.is/nI7qx

Imgur flag redesigns: https://imgur.com/q2D8kDv

Matt “Oktoberfaust” Johnson: a fascist in the Omaha metal scene

autopsick

UPDATE: Matt was kicked out his band, barred from multiple venues, and fired from his screenprinting job.

Matt Johnson, a well-known drummer in Omaha’s metal scene is also a “white identitarian” fascist associated with Identity Evropa. Currently, Matt Johnson plays with the death metal band Autopsick (formerly known as Rotting Malignancy) and has also played drums in Byleth. Matt Johnson was working at a screenprinting shop in the same Midtown Omaha neighborhood where white nationalist and neo-Nazi flyers keep appearing and keep being removed. Matt has since been fired from that job.

Identity Evropa focuses on recruiting college-aged, white students in order to discuss “race realism” and white interests such as racism and reverse racism. Targeting disaffected young men, IE brands itself as a fraternity and social club. Matt Johnson is in the backrow on the far right of this member photo aptly file-named on the IE website as “member photo” because why hide?

We first became aware of Matt Johnson by way of his comments on a Youtube video (live and archived comment links because he’s changed his name to Kraise Pek http://archive.is/fzR6L) from 3 News Now coverage of alt-right cards left behind on a Black man’s car with broken windows. The same cards now linked to a Hastings, NE man, William G Rempel aka Tiptiptopkek.

 

Screenshot_2017-08-07-12-05-50.png

Autopsick in the studio recording drums for their song ‘Await Your Demise‘  filmed by guitarist and band mate Spencer. Another comment of Oktoberfaust raised some flags, when he commented on a fan-made best-of video for The Daily Shoah, the once and final home of aspiring Vanguard America organizer and fellow Omahan, Cooper Ward.

Since the election of Trump, Matt Johnson has spent many hours on the now-deplatformed Daily Stormer and has sheared his head-banging mane in favor of the Nathan “woman puncher” Damingo-style fashy haircut. Matt is so starved for a sense of belonging and a confirmation of possessing intelligence and masculinity, like many of these up-and-coming fascists, they will fall into any trends that present themselves. This is how Matt Johnson found himself driving to Burns, Tennessee in that cute little car with the vanity plate GNOS1S (Greek for knowledge of spiritual mysteries) to attend the 15th annual American Renaissance conference, hosted by “race realist” Jared Taylor. Only things didn’t go as traditionally unnoticed as the many previous gatherings of these suit and tie educated racists. Antifa made a large showing, gathered plenty of mysterious intel, and Taylor himself questioned the viability of continuing his conference in 2018. Okay, so our intel wasn’t that mysterious. We saw you inside taking photos at the “antifa zoo” and we later wondered, what did Richard Spencer order for dinner when you sat with him that night?

Matt Johnson is a screenprinter by trade, a drummer by practice, and a fascist by design. The Omaha music scene must not allow racism or Johnson’s brand of “academic fascism” to take root.

 

William G Rempel aka tiptiptopkek, Hastings, NE white nationalist

William G Rempel, age 50, aka tiptiptopkek, was issued citations on Thursday, August 17, 2017 for putting up white nationalist posters on city property in Hastings Nebraska. The 50 year old man was identified by police in surveillance footage lurking around in the dark near schools, and affixing the posters with what was described as self-adhesive paper.

The background image on the posters feature a large jera rune, a pre-Germanic inscription meaning “year” or “harvest” in the Elder Futhark alphabetic arrangement.

The jera rune design matches the same as found on “alt-right business cards” that were left on cars with broken windows at the College World Series earlier this summer, and were investigated as hate crimes. The same cards have found their way onto college campuses and restaurants in Missouri, Iowa, and Michigan as early as Summer/Autumn 2016.

Rempel has numerous social media accounts including many neo-nazi forums like Stormfront, Daily Stormer, The Purity Spiral, and The Right Stuff. Rempel posts as tiptiptopkek and on Reddit as tiptiptopkek-NE. County records list him at 1607 w 3rd st Hastings, NE 402-834-0071.

Links:

Hastings man cited for white supremacist poster

http://www.nbcneb.com/content/news/440830223.html archived link: http://archive.is/3U4uh

Navy Veteran victim of hate crime in downtown Omaha

http://www.3newsnow.com/news/local-news/navy-veteran-victim-of-hate-crime-in-downtown-omaha archived link: http://archive.is/I7NhW

 

Tiptiptopkek-NE on Reddit

July archive: archive.is/okIhj August archive: http://archive.is/kcDlP

Tiptiptopkek on Stormfront

http://archive.is/LjPDR

Tiptiptopkek on Daily Stormer

April archive: https://archive.is/TE5hG

Tiptiptopkek on The Purity Spiral

http://archive.is/yFpHU

Tiptiptopkek on The Right Stuff

http://archive.is/8OgDU

Iowa State alt-right cards found in library http://www.iowastatedaily.com/news/politics_and_administration/campus/article_abcb5e5e-e4c7-11e6-a96e-3f921cd34b96.html

Eastern Michigan University alt-right cards found

https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/michigan/articles/2017-03-21/university-denounces-card-with-white-nationalist-information

Lee’s Summit, MO alt-right cards in restaurant

http://fox4kc.com/2017/02/22/discovery-of-alt-right-business-cards-at-lees-summit-restaurant-leaves-woman-shocked-and-upset/

Daniel Kleve, UNL student, Vanguard America member

Daniel J Kleve of Norfolk, NE, currently attending the University of Nebraska-Lincoln as a junior 2017-18 – major: biochemistry. Member of Vanguard America, creator of the group Racial Theocracy, acted as security for high-profile Alt-Right personality Tim “Baked Alaska” Gionet while in Charlottesville, VA during the Unite the Right rally August 12, 2017.

kleve banner(Daniel Kleve (left) is photographed holding an Vanguard America banner near Ashland, NE on August 6th, 2017)

Daniel Kleve is a member of the white nationalist group, Vanguard America. Kleve attended the Unite the Right rally as a member of VA, and provided private security.

Vanguard America is a white supremacist group that opposes multiculturalism and believes the U.S. is an exclusively white nation. Using a right-wing nationalist slogan, Blood and Soil, VA romanticizes the notion that people with “white blood” have a special bond with “American soil.” This philosophy first originated in Germany (as Blut und Boden) and was later popularized by Hitler’s regime. In the same vein, VA uses “For Race and Nation” as a variant slogan. James Fields was also a member of Vanguard America. Fields was the driver of the car that rammed into an anti-racist march in Charlottesville, VA on August 12, killing Heather Heyer, and injuring 19 others.

Previously known as American Vanguard – and before that, Reaction America – before joining the Nationalist Front, a confederation of hate groups co-led by Jeff Schoep, the leader of the neo-Nazi Nationalist Socialist Movement, and Matthew Heimbach, the leader of the Traditionalist Workers Party. Vanguard America gained their first taste notoriety when Anti-Fascist Action Nebraska outed their National Deputy Director, Cooper Ward of Omaha, NE, and another student in the University of Nebraska-Omaha school system. Ward dropped out of UNO on January 18, the same day thousands of flyers with his face and neo-Nazi connects were made public on campus. Ward also left, The Daily Shoah, a popular fascist podcast he co-hosted on The Right Stuff radio network.

Daniel J Kleve of Norfolk, NE, currently attending the University of Nebraska-Lincoln as a junior 2017-18 – major: biochemistry https://directory.unl.edu/people/dkleve2 (http://archive.is/xrA6b)

– ADL backgrounder on Daniel Kleve’s group ‘Racial Theocracy’ described as “the idea that religious fulfillment comes from the proper expression of racial, social, and spiritual characteristics.”

https://www.adl.org/education/resources/backgrounders/from-alt-right-to-alt-lite-naming-the-hate (http://archive.is/XWxcv)

Twitter: @RacialTheocracy (http://archive.is/GwO74)

– Charlottesville, VA Unite the Right Rally on 8/12/17 crowdfund page (http://archive.is/vYGDB)

Facebook account 1 (http://archive.is/1KVeJ);

Facebook account 2 (http://archive.is/5bDla)

Facebook selfie of forearm tattoos (http://archive.is/RbPka)

Facebook selfie in a “Right Wing Death Squad” tank top (http://archive.is/jlGCT)

– Norfolk, NE 2016 primaries exit polls interview with Norfolk US92 News (http://archive.is/VIJnu)

Drives White Dodge Dakota Sport (http://archive.is/JhJ6B)

 

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